- Definition of Alcoholism by Journal of American Med. Assoc.

Definition of Alcoholism by Journal of American Med. Assoc.




Help for alcohol abuse addiction alcoholics who want to stay sober

Definition of Alcoholism by Journal of American Med. Assoc.

Postby Dallas » Sun May 28, 2006 6:21 pm

This comprehensive definition of Alcoholism was published by the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1992. This definition was prepared by the Joint Committee to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

Approved by the Boards of Directors of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (February 3, 1990) and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (February 25, 1990).



Definition of Alcoholism -- published by the Journal of the American Medical Association

" Alcoholism is a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by continuous or periodic: impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial ."

"Primary" refers to the nature of alcoholism as a disease entity in addition to and separate from other pathophysiologic states which may be associated with it.

"Primary" suggests that alcoholism, as an addiction, is not a symptom of an underlying disease state.

"Disease" means an involuntary disability. It represents the sum of the abnormal phenomena displayed by a group of individuals. These phenomena are associated with a specified common set of characteristics by which these individuals differ from the norm, and which places them at a disadvantage.

"Often progressive and fatal" means that the disease persists over time and that physical, emotional, and social changes are often cumulative and may progress as drinking continues. Alcoholism causes premature death through overdose, organic complications involving the brain, liver, heart and many other organs, and by contributing to suicide, homicide, motor vehicle crashes, and other traumatic events.

"Impaired control" means the inability to limit alcohol use or to consistently limit on any drinking occasion the duration of the episode, the quantity consumed, and/or the behavioral consequences of drinking.

"Preoccupation" in association with alcohol use indicates excessive, focused attention given to the drug alcohol, its effects, and/or its use. The relative value thus assigned to alcohol by the individual often leads to a diversion of energies away from important life concerns.

"Adverse consequences" are alcohol-related problems or impairments in such areas as: physical health (e.g., alcohol withdrawal syndromes, liver disease, gastritis, anemia, neurological disorders); psychological functioning (e.g., impairments in cognition, changes in mood and behavior); interpersonal functioning (e.g., marital problems and child abuse, impaired social relationships); occupational functioning (e.g., scholastic or job problems); and legal, financial, or spiritual problems.

"Denial" is used here not only in the psychoanalytic sense of a single psychological defense mechanism disavowing the significance of events, but more broadly to include a range of psychological maneuvers designed to reduce awareness of the fact that alcohol use is the cause of an individual's problems rather than a solution to those problems. Denial becomes an integral part of the disease and a major obstacle to recovery.

--End of definition --

Note: Alcoholics Anonymous is not affiliated with the American Medical Association, or any other outside entity. AA does not endorse the AMA, and has no opinion on medical or other health related conditions.

Alcoholics Anonymous is a Program of Recovery, as described in the book, Alcoholics Anonymous - to treat alcoholism. The 12 Step Program of Alcoholics Anonymous has helped millions of alcoholics to live sober, happy, and productive lives, with their method of treating alcoholism.

If you suspect that you have a drinking problem, or that you may be alcoholic, and you desire to do something about it... it is highly suggested that you may want to contact the Fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous, and obtain the book, Alcoholics Anonymous, which contains the highly successful AA Program of Recovery.

Thank you, for allowing me to share this information with you. I hope it will be helpful to you, or to someone you care about!

Dallas


:wink:
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Postby Rusty Zipper » Sun May 28, 2006 9:33 pm

when did they meet me?
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Postby Dallas » Sun May 28, 2006 10:23 pm

They were evaluating you when they wrote the definition!
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Postby Rusty Zipper » Mon May 29, 2006 12:46 am

:lol: :lol: :lol: :roll: :wink:
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excellent information

Postby Vickie V » Tue Sep 11, 2007 10:35 pm

Thank you for this information, As a women that works in Indian Child Welfare.

I am amazed at the way some alcoholics are treated. The fact that is a disease appears to be put aside.

I watch daily as people treat alcoholics like Worthless low lifes and I am a bit frustrated. I have a good opportunity to educate people and this along with other information is really helpful for the debates on choice verse disease.
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Postby Dallas » Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:36 am

Thanks for sharing your experience on this Vicki.

It's really sad what happens to the alcoholic.

Right now -- in my area -- of Fort Smith, Arkansas -- I've noticed at least one major hospital that appears to be "patient dumping" if the patient is alcoholic or if they come in to the hospital on drugs.

I took a lady in to the ER about 2 weeks ago -- her history is 1/2 gal Vodka every day -- (she's only 5 feet tall -- a real little one, but 1/2 gal a day is a lot even for a huge man!)

They wanted to dump her -- and put her back on the street intoxicated. Her BAC was so high when they called me to pick her up -- had she been walking down the street she would have been arrested for public intox. I showed them my video camera and let them know it was being documented. They insisted they were going to have me arrested if I didn't ditch the video camera -- and they proceeded to dump her anyway. If she had been sober enough -- she could have requested rehab -- but the hospital wasn't about to let her get sober enough to request rehab because she has not insurance.

The most dangerous and fatal time in detox is often after 24 hours and before 48 hours, they can die, go into convulsions, or have strokes.

Needless to say -- since she's still drunk when they take her out of the hospital -- there wasn't much to work with in regards to recovery.

This morning she's back in the ER ... same one that dumped her 2 weeks ago. She tried to stop drinking on Sunday -- and by Tuesday was convulsing. She has no insurance.... so they dumped her out again today.

Interestingly enough: Almost three years ago -- I was trying to open a detox facility in Fort Smith (they don't have one). And, it was members of the fellowship that worked the hardest... to insure that the detox facility didn't get opened. I ran out of money -- and I couldn't fight them -- to try and get it off the ground. Go figure.

I hear horror stories about it going on all over the U.S. right now -- alcoholics and mental illness patients appear to be doomed if they need medical emergency care -- or hospitalization.

Dallas
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Postby HollyR » Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:02 pm

thanks dallas for that information. i work with alcoholics and drug addicts and i can diffinitly use that information when i teach group..keep coming with the info!
-holly
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