- Tradition One -- Checklist

Tradition One -- Checklist




Discussion related to the 12 Traditions

Tradition One -- Checklist

Postby Dallas » Tue Jun 12, 2007 10:49 am

Tradition One -- Checklist

Tradition One: Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.


1. Do I engage in negative discussions and talk bad about other A.A. members?
2. Do I engage in gossip, rumors and taking other A.A. members’ inventories?
3. Am I careful about throwing AA names around—even within the Fellowship?
4. Am I as considerate of other AA members as I want them to be of me?
5. Do I spout platitudes about love while indulging in and secretly justifying behavior
that bristles with hostility?
6. Am I in my group a healing, mending, integrating person, or am I divisive?
7. Am I a peacemaker? Or do I, with pious preludes such as “just for the sake
of discussion,â€
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Postby DebbieV » Tue Aug 07, 2007 1:15 am

Hope no one minds, but I was going to print out what Dallas posted and I thought I would just answer online. Call it a 5th step if you will. So here it goes.

1. Do I engage in negative discussions and talk bad about other A.A. members?
Yes: I am making use of my 10th step to stop it.

2. Do I engage in gossip, rumors and taking other A.A. members’ inventories?
Yes: Bad at that one, taking inventories. once again using my 10 step to stop it, and let God be God and me be me.

3. Am I careful about throwing AA names around—even within the Fellowship?
Yes: I do try and am pretty good about the 2nd letter of AA

4. Am I as considerate of other AA members as I want them to be of me?
NO: :oops: thats all I can say on that one.

5. Do I spout platitudes about love while indulging in and secretly justifying behavior that bristles with hostility?
Yes: That is me playing God, once again 10th step.

6. Am I in my group a healing, mending, integrating person, or am I divisive?
Yes/No: I do try on this, and as long as I dont BS myself I think I do a pretty good job.

[i]7. Am I a peacemaker? Or do I, with pious preludes such as “just for the sake of discussion,â€
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Tradition 1

Postby musicmode » Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:23 pm

Spiritual progression, not spiritual perfection. I have both fallen short, and...I've practiced this principle outside of AA with bewildering success (as in, holy jumpin' catfish! That works!! :shock: . Duh :roll: ). Where I begin to "bristle with antagonism" is when I see/here those comments: (and this is a general statement to sum it up)..."I know he/she is just human, but...blah, blah, blah; or, "I'm not the judge, but.... If I'm tired, or feeling a little off, then I find myself taking a bite of the fish-hook and go along for the sake of conversation. What I've discovered is...how awful :mrgreen: :oops: :cry: I feel afterwords. So, I've learned by my gut to not get sucked in to a place I don't want to go. When me is left out of it, then I am able to pause, and back away a step from the situation (copping Tradition 10), the outcome, for me...is not even a hint of residue of resentment, anger, or shame, guilt and embarrassment. I've caught, too...where, I've defensively thought: "That's not AA,"..."justifying" my--what? Resentment...that's what. I've discovered that I must be as careful in AA, as I must be outside, because...I wouldn't want someone else who might know that I AM in AA, to see me fly off the handle or overhear something off color and perhaps false, and have them say/think: see, that's why I don't go, AA doesn't work. I like it when, someone who sees/knows what all might be going on in my life that maybe isn't a good stretch (such as the present), and have that someone say to me: With all of this going on, how are you staying so cool and collected?? When there is peace and serenity amidst all the hoop-la...that's the type of example I want to put out there, and...if they know I'm in AA...maybe, just maybe...I've inadvertantly done just a little 12th-step work, and, if they do know I'm in AA...maybe they'll be more inclined to drop in and check it out :wink: .

Amongst us, though...we need to keep in mind that...that just might be where that person is at in their program, that maybe they are struggling, and they maybe aren't quite grasping something that "should be so simple"--because that's what they hear it should be. Perhaps they're confused about something and they aren't "getting it". If they're discussing and frustrated with a person or a group, or a concept--perhaps we need to really listen in between the lines to what they are really saying and really feeling. True, it might be that they just want their own way--so they throw a coniption as a result...but--maybe not. The answer, I feel, is compassion, and empathy. The same as what we might offer a sick friend. We share a common denominator, we have this disease called alcoholism. It's a disease, and we have it. We are all trying to live a different way than what we have grown accustomed to. I "learned" how to deal with life by using alcohol, I was an alcoholic when I was 10--and before that, too. I quit when I was 33. That's a long time to recover, and relearn how I was really supposed to be living--without alcohol. I didn't become an alcoholic over night, so it's going to take time to learn how to live without alcohol, and I, am not an exception.

Keep it simple,
Anne
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Our common welfare should come first

Postby Dallas » Sat Sep 15, 2007 1:50 am

Note: This is a duplicate post -- it goes here in Tradition One -- but, I also felt it would be a good "Recovery Forum" topic also....
-------------------------------------------------------------------

"Our common welfare should come first;
personal recovery depends upon A.A. Unity."

(Tradition One of the Twelve Traditions – Alcoholics Anonymous)

“The unity of Alcoholics Anonymous it the most cherished quality our Society has. Our live, the lives of all to come, depend squarely upon it. We stay whole, or A.A. dies. Without unity, the heart of A.A. would cease to beat; our world arteries would no longer carry the life-giving grace of God; His gift to us would be spent aimlessly. Back again in their caves, alcoholics would reproach us and say, "What a great thing A.A. might have been!" (Bill W., Twelve Steps & Twelve Traditions)


I consider Alcoholics Anonymous as one of the most precious gifts -- that God has ever given me. Without it, I wouldn’t be alive, let alone sober – happy, joyous and free. I was the equivalent of a dead-man walking – when God, through A.A., resurrected me and gave me a life with opportunities beyond my wildest dreams.

In A.A., I discovered a new design for living – the 12 Steps and the 12 Traditions. It gave me the tools to resolve and remove my conflicts with myself, with a God – that I can sometimes understand, with the people in my past, and those in my present. It gave me tools that I use – to resolve any current conflicts, and to dress and treat and heal emotional hurts and pains. It gave me tools to use to re-create my life, and to continue to create and build a new life -- to help me develop positive objectives and ideals, and the tools to take my new dreams and turn them into reality.

I’m sure that I’m like many of us – who have suffered some horrible and painful experiences of the past – life is not easy for an alcoholic – especially those who have not found the sobriety that so many of us enjoy today. If life for us had been such a Paradise – or, if we had been born with marvelous coping skills and tools to deal with our conflicts – I doubt if some of us would have ever turned to alcohol for the relief that we needed to survive.

The greatest emotional difficulties that I experience today – is when I see one member of Alcoholics Anonymous going after another member of Alcoholics Anonymous, and tearing them down, with words and character assassinations, or gossip, or rumors – all because they didn’t get something that they wanted – in the way that they wanted it. Their feelings were hurt. So they dress their wounds with words of bitterness which deceives themselves.

One example that I’ve seen is when one alcoholic member of the Fellowship – feels threatened by another member – because the other member is getting some attention or recognition, possibly for helping others – and the one member starts talking negatively of the one that’s getting attention. Soon, gossip and rumors are floating around the fellowship – and now several members get involved, and a spiritual sickness has infected the A.A. Group. Not only does this cause harm to all who have become involved – but it now diminishes the effectiveness of the member who was getting some attention for helping others – and, it makes it more difficult for the effective member to help newcomers. The newcomers to the Group see it and it reflects on A.A. as a whole.

Another example I’ve seen is when one member borrows money from another member – and, they are not able to pay it back. A squabble starts – and, the two members can be hurling words of criticism and accusations at each other – and, it not only harms them – but it harms the Group, it harms potential prospects for the Group, and it gives a black-eye to A.A.

Sober alcoholics – as sensitive as they are – are typically emotionally fragile. They often seem to break easy. Without alcohol – all of their senses are magnified. They feel the full effect of intense emotions – whether it’s hurt and pain and fear and resentment – or positive feelings of love and care and concern.

We often discuss our selfishness, our self-centeredness, self-seeking, and Egoism -- and the fact that some how, some way -- we step on the toes of our fellows and they retaliate – and we are supposed to look and find our part – of how we placed ourselves in a position to be hurt.

However – there is also another side. And, I’m reminded of a few sentences from the Dr.’s Opinion, that discusses other attributes of A.A. members – and sometimes, it’s while demonstrating these attributes – that members place themselves in a position to be hurt – even when their motives and intentions are right.

In the Doctor’s Opinion, on page xxv (3rd Edition) or page xxx (4th Edition) I read: “The cases we have followed through have been most interesting; in fact, many of them are amazing. The unselfishness of these men as we have come to know them, the entire absence of profit motive, and their community spirit, is indeed inspiring to one who has labored long and wearily in this alcoholic field. They believe in themselves, and still more in the Power which pulls chronic alcoholics back from the gates of death.â€
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Postby ccs » Mon Jun 01, 2009 11:13 pm

On Tradition One
“Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity."
Editorial by Bill W.
A.A. Grapevine, December, 1947
"Each member of Alcoholics Anonymous is but a small part of a great whole. A.A. must continue to live or most of us will surely die. Hence our common welfare comes first. But individual welfare follows close afterward."

Our whole A.A. program is securely founded on the principle of humility--that is to say, perspective. Which implies, among other things, that we relate ourselves rightly to God and to our fellows; that we each see ourselves as we really are--"a small part of a great whole." Seeing our fellows thus, we shall enjoy group harmony. That is why A.A. Tradition can confidently state, "Our common welfare comes first."

"Does this mean," some will ask, "that in A.A. the individual doesn't count too much? Is he to be swallowed up, dominated by the group?"

No, it doesn't seem to work out that way. Perhaps there is no society on earth more solicitous of personal welfare, more careful to grant the individual the greatest possible liberty of belief and action. Alcoholics Anonymous has no "musts." Few A.A. groups impose penalties on anyone for non-conformity. We do suggest, but we don't discipline. Instead, compliance or non-compliance with any principle of A.A. is a matter for the conscience of the individual; he is the judge of his own conduct. Those words of old time, "Judge not," we observe most literally.

"But," some will argue, "if A.A. has no authority to govern its individual members or groups, how shall it ever be sure that the common welfare does come first? How is it possible to be governed without a government? If everyone can do as he pleases, how can you have aught but anarchy?"

The answer seems to be that we A.A.s cannot really do as we please, though there is no constituted human authority to restrain us. Actually, our common welfare is protected by powerful safeguards. The moment any action seriously threatens the common welfare, group opinion mobilizes to remind us; our conscience begins to complain. If one persists, he may become so disturbed as to get drunk; alcohol gives him a beating. Group opinion shows him that he is off the beam, his own conscience tells him that he is dead wrong, and, if he goes too far, Barleycorn brings him real conviction.

So it is we learn that in matters deeply affecting the group as a whole, "our common welfare comes first." Rebellion ceases and cooperation begins because it must; we have disciplined ourselves.

Eventually, of course, we cooperate because we really wish to; we see that without substantial unity there can be no A.A., and that without A.A. there can be little lasting recovery for anyone. We gladly set aside personal ambitions whenever these might harm A.A. We humbly confess that we are but "a small part of a great whole."

Bill W.

The A.A. Grapevine, December, 1947
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Tradition One

Postby Jim W » Thu Oct 21, 2010 12:04 pm

“Each member of Alcoholics Anonymous is but a small
part of a great whole. A.A. must continue to live or most
of us will surely die. Hence our common welfare comes
first. But individual welfare follows close afterward.â€
Last edited by Jim W on Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Dallas » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:00 pm

Thanks Jim! That's awesome!!! Mind if I reprint, republish and circulate it around??? It's really that good and I believe it would be helpful for all to read it!

Dallas
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Postby Jim W » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:17 pm

Dallas wrote:Thanks Jim! That's awesome!!! Mind if I reprint, republish and circulate it around??? It's really that good and I believe it would be helpful for all to read it!

Dallas


Not at all Dallas. It was given to me freely by my grandpa sponsor. Most of that came from Don P.
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Tradition One Inventory

Postby Jim W » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:20 pm

This goes beyond the checklist from G.S.O.


Tradition 1
PREPARING FOR THE FIRST TRADITION
(Read pp. 129-131 of the “12 & 12â€
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Postby Dallas » Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:13 pm

Once again, Thank you, Jim!!! This is some of the best material I've seen on the Traditions -- period. I've listened to talks by Don P., but I don't recall hearing any specifically about the Traditions. He sure left some huge foot prints behine, and I'm really grateful, for the things that he left behind for us. I need to go back and do some digging!
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