- Warning some of this pretty harsh but true

Warning some of this pretty harsh but true




Help for alcohol abuse addiction alcoholics who want to stay sober

Warning some of this pretty harsh but true

Postby ccs » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:28 pm

Hey, You Drunks ... Do You Remember When??
We died of pneumonia in furnished rooms where they found us three days later when somebody complained about the smell.

We died against bridge abutments and nobody knew if it was suicide
and we probably didn't know either except in the sense that it was always suicide.

We died in hospitals, our stomachs huge, our livers distended and there was nothing they could do.

We died in cells, never knowing whether we were guilty or not.

We went to priests and ministers, they gave us pledges, they told us to pray, they told us to go and sin no more, but go. We tried and we died.

We died of overdoses, we died in bed (but usually not the Big Bed).

We died in straitjackets, in the DT's seeing God knows what, creeping skittering slithering shuffling things.

And you know what the worst thing was? The worst thing was that nobody ever believed how hard we tried.

We went to doctors and they gave us stuff to take that would make us sick when we drank, on a principle so crazy that it just might work, I guess, or maybe they just shook their heads and sent us to places like Dropkick Murphy's.

And when we got out we were hooked on the drugs they gave us, or maybe we lied to the doctors and they told us not to drink so much, just drink like me. And we tried, and we died.

We drowned in our own vomit or choked on it, our broken jaws wired shut.

We died playing Russian roulette and people thought we'd lost, but we knew better.

We died under the hoofs of horses, under the wheels of vehicles, under the knives and boot heels of our brother drunks.

We died in shame.

And you know, what was even worse was that we couldn't believe it ourselves, that we had tried.

We figured we just thought we tried, and we died believing that we hadn't tried, believing that we didn't know what it meant to try.

When we were desperate enough or hopeful or deluded or embattled enough to go for help, we went to people with letters after their names and prayed that they might have read the right books that had the right words in them, never suspecting the terrifying truth, that the right words, as simple as they were, had not been written yet.

We died falling off girders on high buildings, because of course ironworkers drink, of course they do.

We died with a shotgun in our mouth, or jumping off a bridge, and everybody knew it was suicide.

We died under the Southeast Expressway, with our hands tied behind us and a bullet in the back of our head, because this time the people that we disappointed were the wrong people.

We died in convulsions, or of "insult to the brain".

We died incontinent, and in disgrace, abandoned.

If we were women, we died degraded, because women have so much more to live up to.

We tried and we died and nobody cried. And the very worst thing was that for every one of us that died, there were another hundred of us, or another thousand, who wished that we could die, who went to sleep praying we would not have to wake up because what we were enduring was intolerable, and we knew in our hearts it wasn't ever gonna change.

One day in a hospital room in New York City, one of us had what the books call a transforming spiritual experience, and he said to himself "I've got it," (No you haven't, you've only got part of it) "and I have to share it." (Now you've ALMOST got it!) and he kept trying to give it away, but we couldn't hear it. We tried and we died.

We died of one last cigarette, the comfort of its glowing in the dark. We passed out and the bed caught fire. They said we suffocated before our body burned, they said we never felt a thing. That was the best way, maybe, that we died, except sometimes we took our family with us.

And the man in New York was so sure he had it, he tried to love us into sobriety, but that didn't work either. Love confuses drunks and he tried and we still died.

One after another we got his hopes up and we broke his heart, because that's what we do.

And the worst thing was that every time we thought we knew what the worst thing was, something happened that was worse.

Until a day came in a hotel lobby and it wasn't in Rome, or Jerusalem, or Mecca or even Dublin, or South Boston, it was in Akron, Ohio, of all places.

A day came when the man said, "I have to find a drunk because I need him more than he needs me." (YES, NOW you've got it!!!).

And the transmission line, after all those years, was open. The transmission line was open. And now we don't go to priests, and we don't go to doctors and people with letters after their names.

We come to people who have been there, done that. We come to each other.

We come to try and we don't have to die ......... because the right words have been written ........ in the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.

this is another one from Barefoot Bob(He died sober!)

this is me
, sad thing is alot of that is still happening today
sorry if this offends anyone that was not my intent

its just that when I read it today it reminds me of all the ones still out there dieing I see them on the way to work and I just want them to know they dont have to live like that any more
( i just want them to want to live )

and I just want to say to anyone reading this that is still suffering
You dont have to ! you dont have to suffer you dont have drink you dont have to die of this disease you just have to want to (be willing) to take 12 simple steps in the book of Alcoholics Anonymous to save your life
I pray that you will come and join us


We shall be with you in the Fellowship of the Spirit, and you will surely meet some of us as you trudge the Road of Happy Destiny. May God bless you and keep you - until then.
page 164 in the book
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Postby DiggerinVA » Sat Jul 04, 2009 7:19 am

I really like those words. True so true. Thank You.


Stan
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There is a solution

Postby Dallas » Sat Jul 04, 2009 8:04 am

If your drinking is causing you problems, and you cannot seem to control it. Or, if when trying to control it -- you do not enjoy it -- please contact your local group of Alcoholics Anonymous. We may, have a solution for you!


[quote="Big Book page 24-24"]

The fact is that most alcoholics, for reasons yet obscure,
have lost the power of choice in drink. Our so-called will
power becomes practically nonexistent. We are unable, at
certain times, to bring into our consciousness with sufficient
force the memory of the suffering and humiliation of even a
week or a month ago. We are without defense against the
first drink.


The almost certain consequences that follow taking even a
glass of beer do not crowd into the mind to deter us. If these
thoughts occur, they are hazy and readily supplanted with the
old threadbare idea that this time we shall handle ourselves like
other people. There is a complete failure of the kind of defense
that keeps one from putting his hand on a hot stove.

The alcoholic may say to himself in the most casual way,
“It won’t burn me this time, so here’s how!â€
Dallas
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thank you ccs

Postby robbiechaos » Thu Aug 06, 2009 3:01 pm

It wasnt that long ago I was
there were another hundred of us, or another thousand, who wished that we could die, who went to sleep praying we would not have to wake up because what we were enduring was intolerable, and we knew in our hearts it wasn't ever gonna change.
and I never want to forget that desperation, the hopelessness of it all. cause once youve been givin hope its easy to forget when you were hopeless.

Thanks
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Postby Dallas » Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:28 pm

Life sure is grand, today, though!

It's amazing what AA, God, the Big Book, the 12 Steps, and working my butt off has been able to do for me!

Dallas
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Postby leejosepho » Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:31 pm

robbiechaos wrote:It wasnt that long ago ...
... and I never want to forget that desperation, the hopelessness of it all. cause once youve been givin hope its easy to forget when you were hopeless.


I certainly cannot speak for everyone, but I can say my own hope today does not in any way cause or lead me to forget the desperation and hopelessness of my past. And, I share that here because I know this about most of us:

"The fact is that most alcoholics ... are unable, at certain times, to bring into our consciousness with sufficient force the memory of the suffering and humiliation of even a week or a month ago ... [and that can leave us] without defense against the first drink." ("Alcoholics Anonymous", the book, page 24)

So then, my point of experience here is simply this:

Trying to remember our pasts so we will not repeat them does not work for people like us. You might not have been meaning to suggest it might, Robbie, yet I nevertheless want to be sure nobody here falls into any such snare without having at least first been warned. Once again:

Trying to remember our pasts so we will not repeat them does not work for people like us.

So then, what is the "solution" for that particular dilemma?

"Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from drinking as intensive work with other alcoholics. It works when other activities fail. This is our twelfth suggestion: Carry this message to other alcoholics! You can help when no one else can. You can secure their confidence when others fail. Remember they are very ill." (page 89)

While trying to help others, it is virtually impossible to forget from where we have come, and that makes it virtually impossible for us to forget about being grateful for the hope we have today.

... and there is yet still another caution here:

None of the above includes or suggests any idea such as "Better him that me", or "Wow, seeing her like that sure kept me sober today!"

No, we do not stay sober by remembering our pasts, and neither do we try to help others so we can feed from their misery. Rather, we go right to where they are and do our very best to let them know they can come right on out back with us.
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Postby gunner48 » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:41 pm

Once again I say my past is my greatest asset. When talking to someone new Maybe he can relate to me by me sharing where I came from.
On page 18 of the big book tells me why----- But the ex-problem drinker who has found this solution, who is properly armed with facts about himself, can generally win the entire confidence of another alcoholic in a few hours. Until such an understanding is reached, little or nothing can be accomplished.
So my past is only important in my attempt to let the new person know that I understand what they are dealing with.
leejosepho Thanks again for the reminder.
LOVE AND PEACE
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My past as an asset

Postby robbiechaos » Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:59 am

I never want to forget that hopelessness not because remembering will keep me sober. There is no action, thought, memory that can keep me sober. If there was I would have found it long ago. I know that only God's Grace keeps me sober. I also know , not from experience but because the big book tells me so, That I must give that which was freely given to me too others so that I may keep Gods grace in my life. I know that when I took my third step I made a pact with my GOD to do his work, Not Robs work. I want to remember that hopelessness so I can stay connected with the hopeless. So that they can see some part of that desperate state of mind still in me, and then see that GOD has transformed that state of mind into something greater. That through me they may find HOPE. If I forget I lose that connection. I lose an incredible asset. And in this Life and Death struggle we need all of the assets we can muster. Sorry Im only in the fellowship 60 days. Working on step 8. But my sponsor tells me I must still help others. Yesterday I spent an hour talking to two desperate souls and I gave them my number. I also spent 15 minutes praying over the casket of someone we lost to this disease. I do what I can, and pray that is enough. :cry:
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Postby Dallas » Fri Aug 07, 2009 1:34 pm

There is no action, thought, memory that can keep me sober.


I've discovered that the action, for me, that has kept me sober, when all other measures failed -- was trying to help another alcoholic. It works and it worked for me.

Of course, it's only been 8,301 consecutive days since my last drink... I hope it will work tomorrow as well as it has for the last 8,301 days. I'm counting on it!

Dallas
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Action

Postby robbiechaos » Fri Aug 07, 2009 2:08 pm

You are correct Dallas, that is what the bb says and it hasnt steered me wrong yet. I stand corrected. I was just trying to say that My God keeps me sober. And that I had tried many other actions, philosophies, ect. and couldnt stay sober. I often have trouble with the english language even though it is my first. LOL. Thanks for keepin me honest
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