- Drug Addicts in AA

Drug Addicts in AA




Discussions related to 12 Step Recovery and Treatment

Postby Ranman99 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:16 pm

Yup yup agreed Jim. Agreed!!!
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Segregation in AA

Postby daily reprieve » Wed May 12, 2010 1:28 pm

AA meetings are not places for members with long-term sobriety to practice segregation. Alcoholics Anonymous is a group of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope so that others may achieve SOBRIETY. The largest battle looming over the horizon in any recovery program is not only getting the newcomer into the rooms but getting them to keep coming back. My experience is that I don't have all the answers but listening in meeting to those with drugs in their stories affords me the opportunity to steer the newcomer towards someone who may be able to help in the areas where my experience is lacking. Do I believe in the practice of a 15 minute share centered on drugs in the rooms of AA? No. "We meet frequently so that NEWCOMERS may find the fellowship (AA, NA, OA, GA) they seek." Pg. 15-16. Not those with long-term sobriety, who seem to be the ones offended by drugs in AA. My job is not to make people feel unwelcome. God's will for me is to help newcomers find the life that the 12 steps has to offer, whether they have a needle in their arm or a flask in their pocket. Success depends upon temperance by those sharing and tolerance by those listening. Trying to change other people's behavior to meet my ideals is a character defect that I hope the 12 steps has addressed. Keep in mind, WE don't say "Keep coming back, it works but only if you are alcoholic." The 12 -steps transcends all regardless of what you took to finally take them. And the WE includes addicts and alcoholics in God's world.
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Postby Dallas » Fri May 14, 2010 5:42 am

Thanks for sharing. I don't agree with your opinions and I'm sure that you don't agree with mine. :lol: But, I can still care about you and appreciate you, and appreciate your right to be different than me. :wink:

Sorry if my other message was too sharp. One of those sensitive nerves got touched and I flinched. I'm trying to do better.

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Postby Jim W » Fri May 14, 2010 9:15 am

< "We meet frequently so that NEWCOMERS may find the fellowship (AA, NA, OA, GA) they seek." Pg. 15-16>

Not exactly what that sentence means. We meet frequently so that alcoholic newcomers can find the fellowship they seek. N.A., O.A., and G.A. meet frequently so that newcomers having those respective problems can find the fellowship they seek. If someone who isn't alcoholic shows up at an A.A. meeting, hopefully we can kindly steer them towards the fellowship most appropriate for their problem. Of course, if it is an open meeting, they can stay, but we shouldn't mislead them into believing that they qualify for membership. If they are at a closed meeting, they should gently be told that they cannot stay.

<And the WE includes addicts and alcoholics in God's world>

The WE in Alcoholics Anonymous is composed of alcoholics. I understand what you mean in the bigger sense of the word, but you are implying that we throw the doors open and abandon our primary purpose.

I'd like to share a current experience with you. My (A.A.) home group takes its message into the local detoxes several times a month. We run our meeting a little different. We run it as a panel and the last half hour is Q & A from the patients. One thing I have noticed is that it is always the alcoholic patients who say "I know, I know" or who look at me like "Who is this arrogant bastard?" when I mention that permanent recovery is possible and it is the addicts who seem hungry for answers to questions about sponsorship & step work.

A few months ago, one of those patients, a long-time heroin addict approached me. This guy is fifty years old, been shooting dope for twenty years. Doesn't have a vein left in his body. His legs are a mass of scar tissue from abscesses. He will die real soon if he goes back out. Here are his exact words to me regarding N.A.: "I f**king hate N.A. meetings! All they are is a bunch 19 year-old meth heads and oxy kids who relapse time after time and hug each other after every relapse and sit in the meetings and talk B.S. and gangsta talk. I find no solution in those meetings." To tell him to go to N.A. would be a death sentence. Yet here is the dilemma. I tell him to go to open A.A. meetings, because I am taking him through the 12 Steps as outlined in The Big Book. Yet, I can't mislead him. I have had to be honest with him and tell him out front that he can't be an A.A. member because he has no history of alcoholism.

So my question to you guys who care more about what makes YOU feel better about yourselves that whether an addict lives or dies is where do send a guy like this?

I think I've found an answer to that question. Some years back, some addicts in Sweden who had been struggling in N.A. stumbled onto something really simple-that taking the steps out of The Big Book worked for them. They started a new fellowship called Drug Addicts Anonymous. The movement has spread to the U.K. and there are a few groups in Dallas, TX and in Florida. The Dallas groups are associated through sponsorship with members of The Dallas Primary Purpose (A.A.) Group, so I've been able to contact the guy who started D.A.A. down there. My vision is to help the few heroin addicts I've sponsored get this fellowship going in this area so that sick addicts can have a place to come hear a message and that recovered addicts can have a place to carry a message.

This will be slow going and will take some work, but at least then we will have a place to send guys like my friend that we can feel good about sending them to.
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Postby Dallas » Fri May 14, 2010 7:17 pm

Thanks Jim. And, thanks for the info about DAA. I'd like to find out more so that I can use them as a resource to refer to others, that may find better help there.
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addicts in aa

Postby shelleydeann » Thu Mar 24, 2011 8:34 am

Just wanted to add something here. There is a lady in mu support group who is a member of aa. She has a little over 12years. And she is an addict only. She tried the other program for a few years but said she just couldnt do it. No structure to the meetings and very few people had any recovery time.
So she tried AA. Shes been in the program ever since and has maintained her recovery. When she introduces herself she just says she greatful that she has recovered.
So who knows. But it seems to be working in her life, I think maybe you just have to want it no matter what.
:idea:
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Re: addicts in aa

Postby Jim W » Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:02 am

shelleydeann wrote:Just wanted to add something here. There is a lady in mu support group who is a member of aa. She has a little over 12years. And she is an addict only. She tried the other program for a few years but said she just couldnt do it. No structure to the meetings and very few people had any recovery time.
So she tried AA. Shes been in the program ever since and has maintained her recovery. When she introduces herself she just says she greatful that she has recovered.
So who knows. But it seems to be working in her life, I think maybe you just have to want it no matter what.
:idea:


How can she be a member of AA if she is not alcoholic?
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Postby cue » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:11 pm

Love the discussion. Our group held a singleness of purpose workshop a few years ago. Just like here, there was a wide variety of experiences and opinions shared.
I went into a prison meeting one evening to find an addict doing secretary. He didn't want to go to the NA meeting cos he had a resentment against the other members. He was a good guy, but the guy (also a good guy) I was with was big on the traditions and he refused to let the meeting continue cos of singleness of purpose. The inmates didn't know anything about the traditions so they were a bit annoyed. I had mixed feelings about the whole situation as I knew probably less than the inmates. I still have mixed feelings. However, I believe that there is a world of difference between my feelings and the AA traditions. Sometimes, they are at opposite ends of the spectrum and that's how my life goes. I learned, for me, to let my head rabbit on and let myself feel whatever is flowing, but to base my actions on the principles of AA. That is where I get my freedom.
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Postby Dallas » Wed Apr 13, 2011 7:51 pm

I understand. That's one of the reasons I'm sooo grateful that I have a great sponsor w/ 53 years of active sobriety in AA -- so that I can turn to him when I want answers to questions that are above my head. :lol: And, I'm lucky & grateful that there are some really good AA's with lots of history and experience that I can turn to. However... that doesn't do me much good -- when I'm in an awkward situation and can't connect w/ them to consult. :oops:

For me, this is where I just have to totally rely on my connection w/ the God of my understanding -- and hope I make the right call. And, to be willing to make amends when I do get it wrong.

I also try to keep in mind Rule #62. And, a section in the 12 & 12, when the group was faced with a unique situation -- and the final solution, was to ask a question: "What would the Master, do?"

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I am supprised that individuals are still consumed with this

Postby lilotto » Tue Aug 23, 2011 1:00 pm

Dallas wrote:For me, common sense would tell me that it's not a good idea to see a butt doctor to get my teeth fixed, nor to see a dentist to fix a butt problem.

We often hear discussed, what a great idea it is for a person to discover their purpose in life -- and live a life on purpose.

AA has a purpose.
NA has a purpose
GA has a purpose.
OA and the rest... have a purpose.

One might say that "well, since all those are Anonymous organizations, and some suggest the 12 Steps... they all have the same solution."

However, if you do some researching and checking the facts and visiting the different Anonymous organizations -- few have anything in common with the recovery program of AA, and... AA... as it's name implies... is for Alcoholics.

Why would a man want to join a womans club and a woman join a mens club?

Why would a wind surfer want to belong to a pilots association?

AA has a purpose and the purpose of AA's 12 Traditions -- is to keep AA's singleness of purpose.

Can you imagine a car with one steering wheel -- and five passengers are each trying to steer the car at the same time??? The car ends up crashing in a ditch.

Let the five passengers drive their own car -- and focus on their own steering rather than trying to steer others.

For the most part, what I've seen in meetings where the members do not understand Singleness of Purpose -- it's like the blind leading the blind... and they can't figure out why people aren't recovering.

When I want my lawn mower fixed I go to a lawn mower shop.
When I get my hair cut -- I go to a person that cuts hair.

Well, you might say... "they both deal with cutting, don't they?"

Sure. But, one cuts grass and the other cuts hair.

If I walk into a barber shop -- and the guy or girl pulls out a weed eater...
it isn't difficult for me to decide that I'm in the wrong place. :lol:

Can you imagine how I would look to the other customers, if I was arguing with the barber... as to why he doesn't cut hair with a lawn mower? It's all the same thing... cutting.... Isn't it?

So what if Bob & Bill used drugs?

What person or what doctor hasn't used drugs?

Bob was a doctor.

Bill was a patient.

They didn't get together to fix patients or drug addicts... their common bond was "one alcoholic talking with another alcoholic... for the purpose of achieving and maintaining sobriety -- not drinking alcohol.

The reason that Bill took such great notice of the Washingtonians, a bunch of drunks that were staying sober in the 1860's... was because they disappeared... when they decided to start trying to fix other problems... in other words... when they forgot their primary and singleness of purpose.

Do you think it's a good idea for AA to disappear?

That's what's happening... in the areas where the members are mixing it up and getting away from their primary and singleness of purpose.

Dallas B.
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